Antibiotic Prescriptions in Urgent Care
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Survey Results: Antibiotic Prescriptions in Urgent Care


Question:

On average, how many upper respiratory and pharyngitis infection patients does your UCC treat per month?
  • A. <150 (4 out of 22)
  • B. 151-210 (5 out of 22)
  • C. 211-270 (3 out of 22)
  • D. 270-330 (2 out of 22)
  • E. >330 (8 out of 22)

Question:

On average, how many antibiotic prescriptions does your UCC write per month?
  • A. <35 (1 out of 21)
  • B. 36-72 (3 out of 21)
  • C. 73-144 (7 out of 21)
  • D. 145-290 (5 out of 21)
  • E. >291 (5 out of 21)

Question:

Do you write a prescription for antibiotics when you suspect it is viral because the patient insists on it?
  • A. Never, I always adhere to prescribing guidelines. (4 out of 23)
  • B. Yes, sometimes but it is rare. (15 out of 23)
  • C. Yes, customer service is key and if the patient insists on it, I will write one. (4 out of 23)

Question:

If you answered yes in the question above, do you do this because (Check all that apply):
  • A. You want the patient to perceive higher value for his/her visit. (5 out of 18)
  • B. There is increased competition in your area and if you don’t write a script, some other provider will. (7 out of 18)
  • C. It’s easier to write a script than to educate the patient on how antibiotics won’t help his/her virus or condition. (4 out of 18)
  • D. Despite educating the patient on the risk of antibiotic resistance and lack of efficacy when prescribed for non-bacterial/non-infectious diagnoses, the patient demands the antibiotic anyway. (17 out of 18)

Question:

When treating a child with acute pharyngitis and a negative rapid strep, do you typically:
  • A. Hold the antibiotic until results of the throat culture are back. (15 out of 22)
  • B. Start the antibiotic and stop if the culture is negative. (4 out of 22)
  • C. I don’t use rapid strep tests and I make my decision to treat based on clinical findings. (3 out of 22)

Question:

Do you think urgent care physicians are inappropriately prescribing antibiotics? Please comment:

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