UC Access December 25, 2014
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UCAOA News| Meetings & Education| 2014 Benchmarking Results| Advocacy & Health Policy|
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As 2014 comes to a close, UCAOA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Urgent Care Access a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Thursday, Jan. 8.

Are stethoscopes going the way of the dodo?
CBS News
From Jan. 30: Some experts are saying it's time for doctors to toss their stethoscopes in the trash. An editorial in the December 2013 issue of Global Heart alludes to a near future where physicians will hang up their stethoscopes in exchange for portable ultrasound devices.
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Are consumers ready for retail healthcare?
Oliver Wyman
From May 22: One key to reducing the cost of healthcare is to move as many services as possible out of the doctor's office and the emergency room and into high-quality but lower-cost venues and channels of care, including clinics in drug stores, grocery stores, and other retail establishments and online. But do consumers actually want care in new settings? According to a recent survey conducted by Oliver Wyman of more than 2,000 consumers, there is strong, broad interest in receiving care at alternative sites, but consumers, at least today, do not see all sites as equal.
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Urgent care a booming trend in healthcare
NBIZ Magazine
From May 8: With many patients seeking more affordable and easier access to care than what is offered by hospital emergency rooms and primary care physicians, urgent care is experiencing a nationwide boom — filling the gap by providing high-quality medical care at more affordable prices. Experts say that urgent care facilities are not just for individuals; companies are increasingly relying on the facilities for occupational services and to provide healthcare to their employees.
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Drugstores play doctor: physicals, flu diagnosis and more
The Wall Street Journal
From April 10: Currently there are about 1,600 walk-in medical clinics across the country in drug and big-box stores and supermarkets. The number is projected to double in the next three years due in part to the increased demands of newly insured patients under the Affordable Care Act, according to Accenture. Retail clinics are expanding their services too. For example, some clinics offer management for chronic conditions like diabetes or diagnose patients for some chronic conditions, in addition to treating them. However, big physician groups object to the retail clinics because they say they fragment medical care.
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Stop calling nurse practitioners mid-level providers
KevinMD.com
From Aug. 14: Midlevel provider or nurse practitioner? This topic is debated in a blog post by Dr. Michael Pappas. Within the article, Dr. Pappas makes the case: regardless of title or credentials, patients want to receive excellent medical care delivered to them by a kind and gentle clinician.
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Retail, urgent care clinics grow amid healthcare changes
Stamford Advocate
From Feb. 27: All across the country, walk-in medical clinics — in the form of retail clinics and urgent care centers — have been springing up to cater to those seeking more customer-friendly and time efficient healthcare. The boom in urgent care is even more noticeable. The Urgent Care Association of America, an industry group, estimates that there are approximately 9,000 urgent care facilities nationwide, with at least 300 opening annually since 2008. About 55 percent are located in suburban areas. The bulk of the centers are run by doctors' groups, corporations and hospitals.
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Docs: Urgent care centers can support, not replace pediatricians
Reuters
From May 1: The American Academy of Pediatrics released a policy statement specifying that well-managed urgent care centers can be integrated into communities and enhance children's care, but they should not replace children's primary healthcare teams (known as medical homes). The organization recommends that urgent care centers collaborate with local primary care doctors to make sure documents and other communications are promptly transferred. UCAOA member and the 2014 Outstanding Achievement Award recipient, Dr. Robert G. Graw Jr., a pediatrician and chief executive officer of Righttime Medical Care, explains in the article that urgent care centers, for the most part, are not trying to compete with or provide primary care. He adds that urgent care clinics provide trustworthy care at times when children's private physicians are not available and they integrate patient care with what the primary physician needs to know.
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Transition looms for thriving urgent care industry
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
From June 19: Patients wanting on-demand care rather than a two-day wait for an appointment are increasingly turning to urgent care clinics. "Geographically, urgent care growth has mostly occurred in Midwest and Sun Belt states and largely in suburban areas," said Alan Ayers, MBA, MAcc, UCAOA board member and vice president of market development for Concentra. But there's room for additional growth if urgent care operators can find a way to turn a profit in underserved areas.
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Loyalty's no mystery: urgent care patients signal their intentions
UCAOA
From April 17: It's well established that in order to be successful long-term, an urgent care center must develop a following of loyal patients who consider the center their "first choice" whenever an episodic health concern arises. But rarely do patients voice their future purchase intentions, instead if they're dissatisfied with the service or quality of care they've received, they simply "vote with their feet." In this month's Practice Management article, Alan A. Ayers, MBA, MAcc, UCAOA Content Advisor and Board Member, explains that most patients exhibit behaviors that indicate their attitudes and future intentions to utilize an urgent care center and that by tracking complaints and frequency of use...an urgent care operator can get a good idea of how effective the center is in building patient loyalty. Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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No more warm bodies! Hire the employees you want to keep
UCAOA
From July 31: For many urgent care centers, taking on a new staff member feels like a shot in the dark, with no certainty as to whether you'll get a great employee, a mediocre "warm body," or a new set of problems. In this article, guest blogger Paul Edwards, CEO and Co-Founder, CEDR HR Solutions, divulges tips for consistently finding better employees and making stronger hires. Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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