UC Access May 23, 2013
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UCAOA News Perspectives UConnect Practice Management JUCM Idea of the Week Industry News





UCAOA NEWS


Networking in the Urgent Care Industry
UCAOA
Interact with other urgent care providers and managers every day — and never leave your desk. Networking groups are available, in UConnect, for UCAOA members to post discussions, pose questions and read and respond to posts by other members on subjects pertinent to the delivery and management of urgent care.

Existing groups include:
    Clinical Groups — Occ Med

    Practice Management Groups — Clinic Start Up, Billing and Coding, EHR Users, Hospital owned

    Recognition Groups (invitation only) — Certified Urgent Care, Accredited Urgent Care, UCMC

    State Networking — AL, CA, FL, GA, LA, MI, MS, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, SC, TN, TX, WV

    Physician Members (invitation only) — Urgent Care College of Physicians

What else would you like to discuss? Submit your ideas by completing the Networking Group Request Form online. This is your opportunity to increase your network, dialogue and seek feedback from each other.

To access and "join" these groups (available to members), log in to UConnect. Under the Groups tab on the left menu you will find all of the above groups. Begin sharing your knowledge and expertise with your colleagues today!

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PERSPECTIVES


9 Ways to Build Patient Trust and Referrals
UCAOA

Tara Bradley
How do urgent cares build strong patient relationships in a fast-paced environment?

Empathy is one way. Although urgent care's bread and butter is speed, efficiency, and a streamlined visit process, that doesn't mean care and concern can't be interjected. Empathy is especially important as patients are more likely to choose a doctor because of a personal experience. In fact, a positive personal experience is 2 1/2 times more important to patients than to consumers in other industries. We know it's natural for a clinic running at top-speed to view a case as simply another patient, the standard, the norm.

Click here to read more.

How do you add empathy to your urgent care clinic process? Tell us at http://docutap.com/blog/9-ways-to-build-patient-trust-and-referrals!

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UCONNECT


Practice Management Billing and Coding Forum
UCAOA
Subject: Medicare Patient Coding Question
Submitted May 21: Can anyone tell me how the following situation should be coded for a Medicare patient? A patient comes in with a prescription for an IM or subcutaneous injection, with the medication, and asks that it be given. Examples are a patient who needs a subcutaneous shot of Lovenox, a patient who needs a monthly B12 shot for pernicious anemia or a patient who needs a monthly IM dose of a psych med. Should a history and physical/level charge be generated the first time or every time? If no level charge, then what is the best way to code? What if patient doesn't bring their own medication?

Do you have experience to share? How would you handle this? All members may join this group. Respond and/or ask a question of your own in the Billing and Coding Forum.

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


Is your center prepared to continue operations in the face of a local disaster?
UCAOA
Written by Alan A. Ayers, MBA, MAcc, UCAOA Content Advisor and Board of Directors

From tornadoes to earthquakes to power outages, natural and man-made disasters are on the rise, and in no field is emergency preparedness more critical than in healthcare. Developing an emergency preparedness plan is one of the most important strategic decisions you will make as an urgent care operator. Alan Ayers, UCAOA Board Member and Content Advisor, provides eight steps — from engaging staff to securing systems — to ensure your center will continue to see patients.

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JUCM


Now Online in JUCM
UCAOA
One of the must-read articles in the May issue of JUCM is our practice management feature on establishing a website for an urgent care practice. To reach prospective urgent care patients today, an online presence is essential. The process takes careful planning and execution, as outlined in our step-by-step guide, which covers purchasing a domain name, website hosting, design and build, testing, marketing and maintenance. To read “Establishing Your Online Presence: Website Basics for Urgent Care Operators” by Alan A. Ayers, MBA, MAcc, turn to page 17 online (or in print).

JUCM The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine supports the evolution of urgent care medicine by creating content that addresses the clinical practice of urgent care medicine and the practice management challenges of keeping pace with an ever-changing healthcare marketplace. Are you an urgent care provider who would like to write for our journal? Send an email to editor@jucm.com for information on our author guidelines.

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IDEA OF THE WEEK


Idea of the Week
UCAOA
Slowed down by documentation? Consider using a scribe. The urgent care scribe works at the side of the physician as a documentation assistant. The scribe must document verbatim what is said by the physician and cannot document any of his/her own findings. The encounter notes must indicate "I, Jane Doe, scribed for Dr. John Doe," then both the scribe and the provider sign the chart.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Should football helmets be blamed for head injuries?
By Denise A. Valenti
A jury in Colorado recently determined Rhett Ridolfi was entitled to $11.5 million dollars in damages for injuries. Ridolfi suffered a head injury during an August 2008 practice session with his Colorado high school football team, but he was not immediately taken to a hospital. The blow resulted in a concussion leaving Ridolfi paralyzed on his left side and having brain damage. His family filed a lawsuit against the manufacturer of the helmet he was wearing — Riddell — and the high school administration and football coaches. To what extent companies providing protective equipment for contact sports may be liable when the equipment does not fully protect against injury is not clear.
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Newer whooping cough vaccine not as protective
Reuters
A newer version of the whooping cough vaccine doesn't protect kids as well as the original, which was phased out in the 1990s because of safety concerns, according to a new study.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Innovative EKG poster helps communicate with patients
By Dan White
It is often challenging trying to communicate effectively with patients. Explaining an emergent condition is made much easier with visual aids, but there are not many good ones available for use with a cardiac patient.

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ECG worthwhile for pre-sports check-up
MedPage Today
Screening students before participation in sports with an electrocardiogram to pick up potentially deadly cardiac problems is worthwhile, two European studies argued.

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Facility fees inflate hospital prices for common services
The Denver Post
Facility fees are legal and are becoming more common nationwide as hospitals buy up doctor practices.

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More Americans using retail health clinics
Harvard Health Blog via Chicago Tribune
As wait times to see a doctor for simple problems like sinusitis and urinary tract infection lengthen, more and more Americans are turning to retail health clinics. The number of visits to such clinics quadrupled from 1.48 million in 2007 to 5.97 million in 2009, according to a study published in the journal Health Affairs, and topped 10 million last year.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

Facility fees inflate hospital prices for common services (The Denver Post)
UCCOP/UCAOA Clinical Skills Lab (UCAOA)
Pain relief for next April 15: 4 tax-saving ideas you can do now (By David B. Mandell, JD, MBA, and Carole Foos, CPA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Online tool helps control blood pressure long term
Reuters
In a new study, people with high blood pressure who could communicate with their pharmacists online had better blood pressure control a year after that service ended.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Practices predict losing money, staying independent
FiercePracticeManagement
More than a third of physicians predict their practices will be less profitable (36 percent) in the coming year rather than more (22 percent), according to a new survey of 5,012 physicians from technology company CareCloud and physician-education platform QuantiaMD.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "Affordable Care Act."


Study: COPD over-diagnosed in uninsured patients, increasing healthcare costs
Becker's Clinical Quality & Infection Control
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be over-diagnosed among uninsured patients, unnecessarily increasing cost of care, according to a study to be presented at the 2013 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Innovative EKG poster helps communicate with patients
By Dan White
It is often challenging trying to communicate effectively with patients. Explaining an emergent condition is made much easier with visual aids, but there are not many good ones available for use with a cardiac patient. EKG Concepts has developed one that is perfect. It's called the R-CAT for Arrhythmias Poster. You can easily mount it in your ER's cardiology rooms or staff lounges. It would also be great for helicopter crews and EMS professions.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE




Interested in sharing your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Urgent Care Access, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of UCAOA, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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