UC Access May 9, 2013
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UCAOA NEWS


Fall 2013 Conference — Call for Speakers
UCAOA
If you are interested in sharing your knowledge of the urgent care industry please consider submitting a proposal to speak at UCAOA's Fall 2013 Conference in Glendale, Ariz., Oct. 3-5. For more information please review the Call for Speakers page.
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MEETINGS & EDUCATION


Urgent Care Fall Conference — Save the Date!
UCAOA
Mark your calendars! The Urgent Care Fall Conference will be held in Glendale, Ariz. (near Phoenix) on Oct. 3-5. Registration will be open mid-June.

Both one-day and two-day sessions will be available to choose from! Course topics include:
  • Hands-on Casting and Splinting and I&D Abscess Skills Lab for Mid-Level Providers
  • Reimbursement Strategies
  • Comprehensive Clinic Startup
  • Urgent Care Marketing — Essentials for Growing Your Business
  • How to Reposition Your Center in the Environment of Healthcare Reform
  • Improving the Patient Experience, Capturing Repeat Visits and Spurring Word of Mouth
  • Clinical Masterclasses
  • NEW — Opening General Session on Thursday afternoon

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SPONSORED CONTENT




PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


Practice Management
UCAOA
Just as urgent care has embraced the retail concepts of high-visibility locations, neighborhood convenience, extended hours and patient-focused service — health insurers have likewise embraced "retail." In his May article, Alan Ayers explains how this new channel for of marketing and servicing health plan members affects you and your patients. Click here to read more in UConnect!
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JUCM


Now Online in JUCM
UCAOA
A new urgent care Images Challenge case is now available only on the JUCM website. Review the case of an 8-month-old boy brought to a clinic by a caretaker, who reported that the infant had stopped crawling. Consider what your diagnosis would be, then check the case resolution to see if you were right. Click here to take the JUCM Images Challenge.

The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine supports the evolution of urgent care medicine by creating content that addresses the clinical practice of urgent care medicine and the practice management challenges of keeping pace with an ever-changing healthcare marketplace. Are you an urgent care provider who would like to write for our journal? Send an email to editor@jucm.com for information on our author guidelines.

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IDEA OF THE WEEK


Idea of the Week
UCAOA
Because of the hassles and costs associated with non-sufficient funds (NSF) checks, many urgent care centers accept cash and credit cards only. Most everyone who has a checking account also has a debit or credit card they could use for payment.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Hospital bills can vary widely, even in same cities
HealthDay News
The fees that hospitals charge consumers or insurance providers for services vary widely across the United States, and can even vary within geographic regions and cities, federal officials reported.
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Kids' chemical injuries down, but may rise in summer
Reuters
Injuries from gasoline, lamp oil and similar chemicals have dropped considerably among small children in the last decade, according to a new study. Summertime, however, brings extra risk for exposure to these types of poisonings, especially among toddlers.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Hazardous drugs and worker safety: Emerging regulations
By Matthew D. Zock
California recently introduced Assembly Bill 1202 that would require its state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board to promulgate a standard for hazardous drugs, which includes antineoplastic agents or "chemotherapy."

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6 tips for wage and hour compliance for medical practices
By D. Albert Brannen
Even though many small medical practices may not be covered by federal employment laws such as the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Age Discrimination Act or even Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, most are covered by the federal wage and hour laws.

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Dismissing a problem patient in 10 safe steps
Monthly Prescribing Reference
"Firing a patient" has become common in the modern healthcare environment. The phrase can be seen in print or heard uttered by exasperated providers in reference to individuals who have become "problem patients."

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Telemedicine is retail health clinics' newest tool
HealthLeaders Media
Once a way for people in rural areas to access medical specialists, telemedicine is now being piloted by Rite Aid at its in-store clinics. Competitors Walgreens and CVS may not be far behind. Where does that leave traditional healthcare providers?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "telemedicine."


Retail clinics at tipping point
Modern Healthcare
The Convenient Care Association estimates nationwide there are now more than 1,400 health clinics inside retail chain stores, double the number from six years ago. Industry leader CVS Caremark Corp. now operates 650 MinuteClinics in 25 states and Washington, D.C., and plans to open 150 new clinics in the coming year on its way to having 1,500 in 35 states by 2017. Walgreen, the second-largest player, is planning double-digit growth in 2013 as it expands its Take Care clinic roster of 372 stores.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Hazardous drugs and worker safety: Emerging regulations
By Matthew D. Zock
California recently introduced Assembly Bill 1202 that would require its state Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board to promulgate a standard for hazardous drugs, which includes antineoplastic agents or "chemotherapy." If enacted, California will become the second state to regulate hazardous drug handling in the workplace, as the state of Washington passed a similar bill in 2011 that required its Department of Labor and Industries to adopt a hazardous drugs rule.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

Dismissing a problem patient in 10 safe steps (Monthly Prescribing Reference)
Hospital execs project shift to outpatient care, more HIT spending (FierceHealthcare)
Emergency visits related to sleep drug zolpidem rising (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


'Network of networks' will bolster clinical registries
American Medical News
Organized medicine expects that a new initiative to create a national, patient-centered data infrastructure will not just expand upon and share patient data, but also benefit clinical registries that feed comparative effectiveness research.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Study: Flu vaccine safe for kids with Crohn's, colitis
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Yearly flu vaccinations are safe for children with inflammatory bowel disease, but too few of these youngsters get a flu shot because their parents worry about possible side effects, researchers report.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE




The wages of recruiting rural docs
Modern Healthcare
The doctor shortage in rural America is widespread and projected to get worse. Medicaid expansion and insurance exchanges are expected to provide coverage to about 30 million Americans — but many in rural and underserved communities may have to drive hundreds of miles for care if it isn't available locally.
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