UC Access May 2, 2013
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UCAOA NEWS


Urgent Care Fall Conference — Save the Date!
UCAOA
The Urgent Care Fall Conference will be held in Glendale, Ariz. (near Phoenix) on Oct. 3-5. Be sure to mark your calendars! Registration will be open mid-June. Both one-day and two-day sessions will be available to choose from!

Course topics include:
  • Hands-on Casting and Splinting Skills Lab
  • Reimbursement Strategies
  • Comprehensive Clinic Startup
  • Urgent Care Marketing — Essentials for Growing Your Business
  • How to Reposition Your Center in the Environment of Healthcare Reform
  • Improving the Patient Experience, Capturing Repeat Visits and Spurring Word of Mouth
  • Clinical Masterclasses
  • NEW — Opening General Session on Thursday afternoon

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Webinar
UCAOA
Radiation Protection in an Urgent care Environment: How to Keep your Employees Safe and your Regulators Happy
Presented by Zubair Abbasi M.S., DABR, Director of Technical Operations at West Physics Consulting LLC

Date/Time: Thursday, May 16. 1 p.m. Central
Price: $50 for members | $70 for nonmembers
This one-hour webinar is designed to help you understand, implement and manage an effective radiation protection and safety program in an urgent care environment.
  • Overview of common medical X-ray devises in urgent care and how they are regulated at the local, state and federal level
  • Starting up and maintaining an effective compliant X-ray program
  • Required ongoing quality assurance measures and controls
  • Personnel training and tracking radiation dose exposure
  • Announced vs. unannounced state inspections: What are the regulators look for before, during and after an inspection?
  • Common pitfalls and mistakes to avoid
  • ... and much more including a Q&A time at the end of the webinar.
Click here for more information and to register!

The Urgent Care Association designates this live webinar for 1 AMA PRA Cateory 1 Credit

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SPONSORED CONTENT




JUCM


Now Online in JUCM
UCAOA
Over the course of a lifetime, upwards of 80 percent of adults are likely to experience an episode of low back pain. It's the second most common reason for office visits in the United States and the subject of this month's cover story, by Shailendra K. Saxena, MD, PhD, Mikayla Spangler, Pharm D, BCPS, and Sanjeev K. Sharma, MD, MBA. Their article explores the anatomy of low back pain, steps in clinical evaluation and physical examination of the patient with this complaint, rationale for laboratory studies and radiographic tests and options for management. To read "An Urgent Care Approach to Low Back Pain," turn to page 9 JUCM online (or in print).

The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine supports the evolution of urgent care medicine by creating content that addresses the clinical practice of urgent care medicine and the practice management challenges of keeping pace with an ever-changing healthcare marketplace. Are you an urgent care provider who would like to write for our journal? Send an email to editor@jucm.com for information on our author guidelines.

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IDEA OF THE WEEK


Idea of the Week
UCAOA
The words "billing will fix it" should never cross the lips of your front office staff. Whenever questions arise on a patient's account, the front office staff should work with billing, the payer and/or the patient to resolve the problem before the patient leaves the center.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Emergency visits related to sleep drug zolpidem rising
USA Today
The number of emergency room visits involving adverse reactions to the sleep drug zolpidem — the active ingredient in Ambien and other sleep medications — jumped nearly 220 percent from 2005 to 2010, according to a new report.
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Dismissing a problem patient in 10 safe steps
Monthly Prescribing Reference
"Firing a patient" has become common in the modern healthcare environment. The phrase can be seen in print or heard uttered by exasperated providers in reference to individuals who have become "problem patients." These are patients who fail to complete indicated tests, refuse necessary treatments, miss appointments, do not pay bills, are rude, unreasonably demanding, dissatisfied, dishonest, threatening, violent or litigious.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
A new label for OxyContin
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Although many types of prescription drugs are abused, prescription painkiller abuse is a growing epidemic. Nearly 3 of 4 overdoses are caused by opioid pain relievers.

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6 tips for wage and hour compliance for medical practices
By D. Albert Brannen
Even though many small medical practices may not be covered by federal employment laws such as the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Age Discrimination Act or even Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, most are covered by the federal wage and hour laws.

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Boston bombing a lesson in prep for hospitals
MedPage Today
The Boston Marathon bombing serves as yet another tragic reminder that American healthcare must be prepared to deal with terrorist attacks that result in the injuries typical of the wide-ranging damage caused by explosive devices, experts said.

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Hospital execs project shift to outpatient care, more HIT spending
FierceHealthcare
Only about a third of hospital and practice executives think inpatient admissions will increase this year, a new survey shows, down 30 percent from a year ago. The shift to outpatient services already has begun, with hospitals opening new outpatient facilities including urgent care and other walk-in centers in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.
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Physician-owned hospitals seize their moment
American Medical News
Supplied with government data ranking them among the best for value of care, doctors at these facilities keep fighting to lift expansion restrictions.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Why finding a TB test got difficult
NPR
Hospitals and public health departments around the country are having a tough time coming up with a staple of preventive health care: the skin test for tuberculosis. The shortage, caused by problems at a factory in Canada, is prompting suspension of routine TB testing around the country.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "tuberculosis."


King-Devick Test: An effective concussion screening for athletes?
By Denise A. Valenti
Science has not progressed to the point of enabling us to know who is at risk after a concussion and when a concussive event ceases to be a danger of progressing or having long-term effects. Young athletes are particularly at risk as their brains are not yet fully developed, and little is known about long-term impact of head injury. Changes in brain tissue are known to occur in adolescents suffering concussion. Tests using visual function are proving to be promising in detecting a head injury that has created a concussion.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

ECG worthwhile for pre-sports check-up (MedPage Today)
Walk-ins welcome: Urgent care centers and clinics growing in the midstate (The Inquirer)
Urgent care surge fueled by pressures on health system (American Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FDA approves over-the-counter sales for Plan B
USA Today
Women and girls age 15 and over will soon be able to buy emergency contraception without a prescription. The Food and Drug Administration announced that it was approving Plan B One-Step, also known as the morning-after pill, to be sold in the retail aisle next to other over-the-counter medications. Customers will not have to ask a pharmacist for it.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Healthier Hospital Initiative challenges lead to lower costs, improved patient health
Becker's Clinical Quality & Infection Control
The Healthier Hospitals Initiative's first annual report details how incorporating sustainability initiatives has helped its 370 member hospitals reduce their environmental footprint, lower costs and improve patient health.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE




Most pain apps lack physician input
Internal Medicine News
An evaluation of 222 pain-related smartphone apps showed that many were developed without the input of a health professional, some had inaccurate information, and some of their features weren't as robust as they could be.
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