UC Access April 4, 2013
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UCAOA News Meetings & Education JUCM Idea of the Week Industry News





UCAOA NEWS


Out of the Office Notice
UCAOA
The UCAOA office will be closed April 8-12, while at the National Urgent Care Convention in Orlando. Staff will be checking messages periodically throughout the week and will be back in the office Monday, April 15.
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MEETINGS & EDUCATION


Avoid the $100 Walk-In Fee! Register by Tomorrow, April 5
UCAOA
UCAOA Spring Convention
April 8-11 | Walt Disney World Dolphin Hotel
25 CME Credits Available


PreConvention | April 8 | Choose One
- Comprehensive Clinic Startup 2-day course (April 7-8)
- Growing Your Urgent Care: Sustainable Competitive Advantage
- Plain Film Radiology: An Expert Review
- Successful Reimbursement Strategies
- Taking Your Center from Good to Great

Main Convention | April 9-11 | Choose Sessions Onsite
Educational Topics Include:
Healthcare Reform, Front Desk Operations, Rash Treatment, Patient Flow, Dental Emergencies, Revenue Cycle Management, Abdominal Pain, Starting OccMed, Facial Anesthesia, Contracting with Payers, Growing Your Center, Pediatric Emergencies ... and MANY more!

Go to the National Urgent Care Convention page for more information on registration, session topics and the overall agenda.
Discounted Disney Theme Park tickets are available to convention attendees! Be sure to purchase by April 7th!

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JUCM


Now Online in JUCM
UCAOA
Many parents suffer from "fever phobia" — the erroneous belief that fever alone can hurt their child. It's not surprising, then, that fever is a common chief complaint in pediatric patients presenting at urgent care centers. It's also the subject of this month's cover story, by Brendan Kilbane, MD, FAAP. His article offers recommendations for an age-based approach to laboratory testing of the feverish child that is rigorous yet ensures prompt identification of "not well" patients and appropriate evaluation of "well" patients to rule about any serious bacterial infection. To read "An Age-Based Approach to Fever of Uncertain Origin," turn to page 9 JUCM online (or in print).

The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine supports the evolution of urgent care medicine by creating content that addresses the clinical practice of urgent care medicine and the practice management challenges of keeping pace with an ever-changing healthcare marketplace. Are you an urgent care provider who would like to write for our journal? Send an email to editor@jucm.com for information on our author guidelines.

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IDEA OF THE WEEK


Idea of the Week
UCAOA
Many times patients walk right out of the clinic after treatment or show up having "forgotten" their wallets — to prevent patients from leaving without paying their financial responsibility, any co-pays should be collected prior to the visit. Some centers also require a "cash deposit" or "credit card authorization" for deductibles or self-pay visits.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Crashing down: Kevin Ware's horrific injury rare in basketball
By Denise A. Valenti
The images are graphic. Six minutes before halftime in the Louisville-Duke NCAA Tournament game, Kevin Ware landed from a jump with such momentum that it resulted in a horrific break of both his tibia and fibula. It was a freak accident, and both his teammates and the opposition ceased play and expressed shock. Ware underwent surgery, and the doctors are optimistic about a return to the game, perhaps as early as next season. The type of injury Ware experienced is rare in basketball, but lower leg injuries are not as unusual in other sports.
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Industry Pulse: Which sport leads to the most lower leg injuries?
ANSWER NOW




Urgent care centers benefit community
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
When you get sick, you probably can't find time to go to the doctor. Healthcare has become like everything else — an afterthought to work and family demands. What if you could walk in and see a doctor whenever you wanted? After work or on a Sunday? When it's convenient for you? Many people expect healthcare to be easily accessible. They don't want to take time off work to see a doctor. They want an appointment the same day, not days or weeks later. That's part of the rationale for urgent care centers, a rapidly growing industry in Atlanta and nationally.
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Crashing down: Kevin Ware's horrific injury rare in basketball
By Denise A. Valenti
The images are graphic. Six minutes before halftime in the Louisville-Duke NCAA Tournament game, Kevin Ware landed from a jump with such momentum that it resulted in a horrific break of both his tibia and fibula.

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6 tips for wage and hour compliance for medical practices
By D. Albert Brannen
Even though many small medical practices may not be covered by federal employment laws such as the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Age Discrimination Act or even Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, most are covered by the federal wage and hour laws.

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Perspectives
UCAOA
John Kulin, D.O., FACEP, provides an interesting perspective this month about defining urgent care as convenient care. Probably the toughest question about urgent care is, well, "What is urgent care?"

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Full vaccine schedule safe for kids, no link to autism
USA Today
At least 10 percent of parents of young children skip or delay routine vaccinations, often out of concern that kids are getting "too many shots, too soon." But a new study finds that children who receive the full schedule of vaccinations have no increased risk of autism. The study is the latest of more than 20 studies showing no connection between autism and vaccines, given either individually or as part of the standard schedule. The paper is the first to consider not just the number of vaccines, but a child's total exposure to the substances inside vaccines that trigger an immune response.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "vaccine."


New med school wants to fortify primary doctor ranks
NPR
VideoBriefUnder the Affordable Care Act, millions more people with insurance may be headed to the doctor's office. That means the medical system will need more doctors, nurses, physician assistants, and other healthcare workers to meet the demand. Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., is one of about a dozen new medical schools cropping up, and it's spending $100 million just to get up and running.
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Is your EHR ready for the ADA?
American Medical News
Recent legal challenges and settlements related to violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act highlight the problem of noncompliant e-data. Paying closer attention to the requirements of the ADA and other access rules will help doctors avoid such violations and lawsuits, said Joseph R. Fields Jr., an ADA-defense attorney based in Florida. Taking proactive steps when implementing EHRs and other computerized systems will save physicians significant time and expense later, legal experts say.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

A bridge to health — And away from ER overuse (North Carolina Health News via Kaiser Health News)
Private equity funds rapid growth of walk-in clinics (Reuters)
EHRs rush in where doctors fear to tread (HealthLeaders Media)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Flu season continues to wind down
HealthDay News
The flu season, which got off to an early and virulent start, continues to wind down, U.S. health officials reported. Although still elevated, flu activity declined in most parts of the United States during the week ending March 16, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.
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Study: Patients like online health records access
InformationWeek
When patients at the VA Medical Center in Portland, Ore., were given access to key parts of their electronic health records such as visit notes, lab results and discharge summaries, they believed that the ability to view their records helped them in many ways. They said they gained knowledge about their health, did a better job of taking care of themselves, had an easier time talking to their doctors and participated more fully in office visits, according to a new study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.
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Study: People who see doctor in month after ER visit for chest pain do better
The Windsor Star
People who are at high risk for heart disease and who have been treated in an emergency room for chest pains do better over the long-term if they see a doctor within 30 days of being released from hospital, a new study suggests. In particular, the study found that people who saw a cardiologist were more likely to be alive a year later than people who saw a family physician or didn't get any medical follow-up after an episode in which they were treated in hospital for chest pain.
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Interested in sharing your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Urgent Care Access, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of UCAOA, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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