UC Access February 28, 2013
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UCAOA News Meetings & Education Perspectives JUCM Idea of the Week Industry News



UCAOA NEWS


UCAOA Leaders Judge Health Administration Case Competition
UCAOA
The UAB Health Administration Case Competition is this week — and focusing on urgent care operations! This competition provides graduate students from CAHME-accredited health administration programs an opportunity to put what they have learned into practice with a real-life, real-time case. It is designed to be a capstone experience for the graduate school experience.

Student teams from around the country travel to Birmingham, Ala., to present their recommendations before a national team of judges — including our very own CEO P. Joanne Ray, UCAOA Practice Management Advisor, Alan Ayers, MBA, MAcc, and UCAOA board members Cindi Lang, Steve Sellars, MBA, and Laurel Stoimenoff.

Best of luck to the 32 schools participating in this esteemed competition!

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MEETINGS & EDUCATION


2013 UCAOA Spring Convention
UCAOA
The 2013 UCAOA Spring Convention is right around the corner!
  • PreConvention | April 8 (Please note — Special Comprehensive Clinic Startup 2-day course runs April 7-8)
  • Main Convention | April 9-11 (with a kick-off reception in the exhibit hall the evening of April 8)
34 Practice Management Sessions & 29 Clinical Sessions
Topics Include: Healthcare Reform, Front Desk Operations, Rash Treatment, Patient Flow, Dental Emergencies, Revenue Cycle Management, Abdominal Pain, Starting OccMed, Facial Anesthesia, Contracting with Payers, Growing Your Center ... and MANY more!

Go to the National Urgent Care Convention page for more information on registration, session topics and the overall agenda.

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PERSPECTIVES


Perspectives
UCAOA
Convergence All Around Us
By Tom Charland, CEO of Merchant Medicine LLC

It used to be that the word "urgent" in urgent care medicine was meant to connote a certain level of acuity or seriousness related to a patient's medical condition. In fact, the CDC classifies conditions that present in emergency rooms with different levels: a Level 3 is considered "urgent" and the specific definition is "A visit in which the patient should be seen within 15-60 minutes."

But more recently the term urgent has changed in meaning, particularly from the consumer perspective ... Click here to read more.

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JUCM


Now Online in JUCM
UCAOA
A new urgent care Images Challenge case is now available only on the JUCM website. Review the case of a 25-year-old female with autism and a history of fever. Consider what your diagnosis would be, then check the case resolution to see if you were right. Click here to take the JUCM Images Challenge.

The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine supports the evolution of urgent care medicine by creating content that addresses the clinical practice of urgent care medicine and the practice management challenges of keeping pace with an ever-changing healthcare marketplace. Are you an urgent care provider who would like to write for our journal? Send an email to editor@jucm.com for information on our author guidelines.

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IDEA OF THE WEEK


Idea of the Week
UCAOA
Advertising literature, posters or "wellness" displays placed in your waiting or exam rooms by pharmaceutical companies (or their marketing agents) do little to promote your business. Reclaim that valuable in-center marketing space by replacing those displays with posters and literature promoting products that will add to your center's bottom line — such as flu shots, sports physicals, travel medicine, immigration physicals and employer services.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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Missed diagnoses common in the doctor's office
Reuters
Missed or wrong diagnoses are common in primary care and may put some patients at risk of serious complications, a new study suggests. Although mistakes during surgery and in medication prescribing have been at the center of patient safety efforts, researchers said less attention has been paid to missed diagnoses in the doctor's office.

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Fraudulent data may have led to use of risky treatment in ICUs
HealthDay News
Studies loaded with fraudulent data may have encouraged the use of a treatment for patients in intensive care units that now appears to do more harm than good, new research shows. At issue is hydroxyethyl starch, an intravenous solution sometimes used to replace lost blood volume in critically ill patients.

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Solving primary care physician shortage by turning PCPs into anesthesiologists
Forbes
Are there really too few primary care physicians? And if so, what can we do to solve the PCP shortage? The standard answer to the first question is "yes, we have too few PCPs." And the standard solution is to train more such docs, or allow more foreign-trained primary care docs into the country or, better yet, simply pay PCPs more money, so that graduating medical students will be more likely to pursue such careers. Article's author has a different set of answers.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Healthcare 24/7: New system allows patients to connect with docs online
Fox News
VideoBriefTelaDoc is a new type of interactive system in which patients are able to obtain either a telephone or video consultation with a physician, according to Dr. Michael Bagner, an internist at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City, who is a part of the TelaDoc network of physicians.
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New flu shot could mean fewer illnesses in 2014
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
A new flu vaccine expected by the fall could be an improvement over the current shot that is a relatively poor match with the virus strains circulating this winter. This season's flu shot is 56 percent effective at preventing illness overall and just 27 percent effective in people 65 and older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Pediatricians urged to treat ear infections more cautiously
NPR
VideoBriefHoping to reduce unnecessary antibiotics use, the American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday issued new guidelines for how doctors should diagnose and treat ear infections. Every year, millions of parents take their children to the pediatrician for ear infections, and most of them end up going home with antibiotics. In fact, ear infections are one of the most common reasons kids see doctors and the leading reason kids get antibiotics.
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Missed diagnoses common in the doctor's office
Reuters
Missed or wrong diagnoses are common in primary care and may put some patients at risk of serious complications, a new study suggests. Although mistakes during surgery and in medication prescribing have been at the center of patient safety efforts, researchers said less attention has been paid to missed diagnoses in the doctor's office. Because of how common they are, those errors may lead to more patient injuries and deaths than other mistakes, according to researchers.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Toolkit offers new ideas for preventing hospital falls
American Medical News
Integrating fall-prevention protocols into scheduled rounds, grouping cognitively impaired patients into so-called safety zones and doing post-fall assessments are some new strategies to reduce the number of falls for hospital patients. The ideas are part of a recently released Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality toolkit aimed at cutting the estimated 700,000 patient falls that happen in hospitals each year.
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Docs need more incentives to engage patients
MedPage Today
As evidence accumulates that more engaged patients have better outcomes, more resources need to be invested in getting physicians and healthcare systems to increase patients' involvement in decisions about their care, advocates said.
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