UC Access January 1, 2015
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UCAOA News| Meetings & Education| 2014 Benchmarking Results| Advocacy & Health Policy|
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As 2014 comes to a close, UCAOA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Urgent Care Access a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Thursday, Jan. 8.

Telemedicine, digital health vital to med industry's transition into the future
MedCity News via FierceHealthIT
From Nov. 27: Home visits, telemedicine and digital health all will be ubiquitous as healthcare reform continues to take hold, according to University of Pennsylvania-based health economist Ezekiel Emanuel. Emanuel, who served as a keynote speaker at the New York eHealth Collaborative's Digital Health Conference, predicted that 1,000 acute care hospitals will close as a result of the Affordable Care Act.
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Urgent care on the rise
Healthcare Journal of Baton Rouge
From July 17: The July issue of the Healthcare Journal of Baton Rouge features the insights of the urgent care industry's most respected professionals including Premiere Health Chief Executive Officer, Steve Sellars and Urgent Care Association of America Chief Executive Officer Joanne Ray. Sellars and Ray provided their professional perspective on the rise of the urgent care industry as a strong and complementary component to the healthcare industry.
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Emerging business models: Telemedicine
UCAOA
From March 27: Urgent care has experienced phenomenal growth in response to consumer demand for affordable, no appointment necessary care that is open nights and weekends. But for low-acuity conditions, urgent care may not necessarily be the cheapest or most convenient option available to consumers. As UCAOA Content Advisor and Board Member Alan Ayers, MBA, MAcc, points out in this article, telemedicine is an emerging healthcare delivery channel that stands to capture some patients who might otherwise be seen in urgent care centers. Urgent care operators should thus understand this emerging business model and determine the most appropriate response given their business objectives. Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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SPONSORED CONTENT




Patient Perspectives: How wait times could kill the urgent care
UCAOA
From Aug. 21: For the past 2,000 years, human concepts of time have been linear. Meaning, you're born, go to school, get married, have children and a career, retire and eventually die. This linear thinking entailed waiting for outcomes, and as long as progress was unfolding, people have generally accepted wait as a consequence of life. Thus, urgent care operators who have communicated shorter wait times than other options — namely the ER — were valued by older generation consumers. For the new generation, however, the "future is now" and time is circular — a constant, uninterrupted 24-hour flow. There is no longer tolerance of wait but an expectation of immediacy in everything. As UCAOA Board Member Alan Ayers, MBA, MAcc, explains in this month's Expert Blog, if urgent care operators continue to operate in "linear time," which necessarily involves patient waiting, they could go the way of the dinosaurs as younger generations who have come to expect "zero wait" start migrating to other, immediate, healthcare options. Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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An aging America: The future of healthcare depends on telehealth
By Karen R. Thomas
From Aug. 14: As a country, we are living longer and in greater numbers. The number of people over the age of 65 in America is predicted to rise to nearly 80 million by 2040, according to the Administration on Aging. When that happens, there will be more people living in our country who are over the age of 65 than at any point before in history, a fact that has many wondering if the U.S. healthcare system will have the resources, systems and integration to care for such a substantial older adult population.
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What's causing the antibiotic development stagnation?
By Lauren Swan
From Sept. 18: Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are appearing in headlines more often as time goes by, along with the escalating need for new antibiotics to treat these bacteria. Yet only two new antibiotic treatments have been approved and released onto the market since 2008. There are currently seven new antimicrobial drugs in the FDA pipeline, but none of them will affect the bacteria for which we need them. So where are all the new antibiotics? Why are there so few in the pipeline? It really comes down to three reasons, none of them particularly good.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

















A need for RNs: Heading off the nursing shortage
By Dorothy L. Tengler
From Nov. 20: Despite the chatter about a nursing shortage, registered nurses are near the top of the list when it comes to employment growth, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. In the past decade, the average age of employed RNs has increased by nearly two years, from 42.7 years in 2000 to 44.6 years. Although nurses are choosing to continue working rather than retire, the United States will need to produce 1.1 million newly registered nurses by 2022 to fill jobs and replace those who finally do retire.
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FEATURED COMPANIES




Dealing with problem employees in a high-stakes environment: Best practices for urgent care centers
UCAOA
From March 6: While much has been written on the topic of attracting, developing and keeping good employees, a more frequent problem expressed by urgent care operators is what to do with their bad seeds. It's quite common for centers to have employees they should terminate, but they believe either a "warm body is better than no body" or they don't know how to go about handling the termination without getting sued. In this article exclusive to UCAccess, Damaris L. Medina, an experienced litigation attorney with Los Angeles-based Michelman & Robinson, provides some best practices for urgent care operators. Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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Thinking outside of the box: What urgent care can learn from ZoomCare
UCAOA
From Oct. 2: Success in business entails being responsive to consumer needs — and urgent care has responded with on-demand, no-appointment service, short wait times, locations convenient to home and work, and extended evening and weekend hours coupled with a patient experience emphasis. But with hospital emergency rooms, retail clinics and walk-in primary care offices touting similar benefits, how can urgent care continue to differentiate itself? In this month's practice management feature, Alan A. Ayers, MBA, MAcc, UCAOA Content Advisor and Board Member, introduces Oregon-based ZoomCare, a provider who has integrated cutting-edge technology and specialized services to create a unique brand in its marketplace. What can you learn from ZoomCare to differentiate your own center? Please note this article is for logged in members only.
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False hope for new superbug treatments
By Mike Wokasch
From Aug. 7: The lack of effective treatments for antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" represents a serious global healthcare issue with potentially disastrous consequences. In the hopes of finding new treatments, a number of organizations and governments are struggling to secure and provide sufficient financial and nonfinancial incentives to encourage more research. Unfortunately, the fallacy of some of these initiatives is that more money, more companies and more compounds will not deliver the products we need.
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